Writing About the Humanities, 1/27/14


Bailey Welch
January 27, 2014
Skills
Pre-Writing:
  1. 1. Lists – details about a reading on separate sheet of paper
  2. 2. Annotation
    1. a. Margin – promotes active reading, between text and end of page; LOGICAL and REASON; tries to find meaning
    2. b. Symbols system – find one that’s uniform that you can use every time!
i. Square: Topic – most important thing on the page
ii. Circle: Supporting ideas of topic (lines connecting to square)
iii. Line: Added detail (lines can connect to circles)
  1. c. Synthesis – puts all the information together.
i. Examples: explaining symbol system, writing brief summary, free writing
  1. 3. Freewriting – connecting ideas in PROSE
    1. a. Subject, verb, object
    2. 4. Summarizing/Analyzing
      1. a. They say / I say – for substantial college-level writing.

Writing:
  1. 1. Draft
  2. 2. Editing/Proofreading
    1. a. Check for errors
    2. b. Make sure everything is in correct place and makes logical sense
    3. c. Have someone else read and edit and/or leave it alone for at least 6 hours and then reread and edit.
    4. 3. Revision

Overview
General Approach to Writing the Humanities
  1. 1. React to understand – NO JUDGEMENT
    1. a. Emotions stirred, felt reaction, influence, impression
    2. 2. Interpret to explain (p. 26-33)
      1. a. DiYanni’s Model:
i. Observe details – so specific that they require reference from the text.
ii. Connect observations – my approach to topic.
iii. Develop inferences – because of this, this; due to this, this.
iv. Draw conclusions from inferences – summarized conclusion.
  1. b. Andrew’s Model (research-based approach):
i. Make a claim.
ii. Establish warrants for claim – evidence to support claim.
iii. Test the warrants against others that support alternate claims.
iv. Outline the conclusions of the claim, if the warrant is true.
  1. 3. Evaluate for significance (p. 33-36)
    1. a. Values?
i. Provide context first!

Fiction
Elements of Fiction (p. 86-89):
  1. 1. Plot – the general storyline.
  2. 2. Structure – how the story is told.
  3. 3. Character – represent/stand for something; meaningful.
  4. 4. Setting/Context/Mood – where the story is taking place/when/feeling of story.
  5. 5. Point of View
  6. 6. Style – writer’s verbal identity.
  7. 7. Irony - contemporary point of view.
  8. 8. Symbolism – things that stand for something else.
  9. 9. Theme – wider conversation; general idea of story.
Steps to Writing a Literary Analysis (p. 91):
  1. 1. Annotate the work
  2. 2. Free-write
  3. 3. Outline structure
  4. 4. Identify elements (& explain function)
  5. 5. Describe context
  6. 6. Consider point of view and/or perspective
  7. 7. Discuss with others
  8. 8. Select two key passages. Relate them. IMPORTANT! - be able to pull supporting evidence for your conclusion.
  9. 9. Write a draft
  10. 10. Revise after feedback

Film
Elements of Film:
  1. 1. Photography (p. 48-53)
    1. a. Subject
    2. b. Color
    3. c. Purpose
    4. d. Lighting
    5. e. Style
    6. f. Composition – shots, focus, sequence
    7. 2. Acting
    8. 3. Mise en Scene – where everything is on scene.
    9. 4. Diegesis – everything in the story.
    10. 5. Movement
    11. 6. Editing
    12. 7. Sound/Music


Zach Bieber

Chapter 1: Skills
Pre-Writing
  • Lists – want things that are similar (i.e. items in a set); details that can be abstracted out and used to reference text
  • Annotation –
  1. 1. margins – space between text and edge of a page (follow a logical pattern)
  2. 2. symbol – to properly annotate you should develop a uniformed symbol system
  3. 3. synthesis – explaining symbol system, writing up a summary – something to make sense of everything you’ve done
  • Freewriting – generate ideas, start thinking and writing without have to worry about structure
  • Summarizing/Analyzing – gathering ideas and making sure you have the “they say” part of an argument as well as bringing in the “I say”

Writing
  • Draft – write down your ideas and see how they can be developed and supported
  • Editing/Proofreading – check for errors, making sure everything’s in the right place
  • Revision – getting feedback for your work, specific to what youre writing about

Chapter 2: Overview
  • React – emotions are stirred, feel a reaction, has an influence, leaves an impression
  • Interpret to Explain
    • o DiYanni’s model:
  1. 1. Observe details
  2. 2. Connect observations
  3. 3. Develop inferences
  4. 4. Draw conclusions from inferences
  • o Andrews model:
  1. 1. Make a claim (an unsubstantiated argument)
  2. 2. Establish warrants (evidence to support) for the claim
  3. 3. Test the warrants against others that support alternate claims
  4. 4. Outlines the conclusions of the claim, if the warrant is true
  • Evaluate for Significance – an appraisal or judgment of the cultural, moral, and aesthetic ideals that artworks reflect, support, or embody


Chapter 5: Writing About Fiction
Elements of Fiction
  • Plot – action element; arrangement of events that make up its story
  • Structure – the design or form of the completed action
  • Character – heart of the fiction
  • Setting/Context/Mood – where everything is taking place
  • Point of View – an author’s choice of who tells the story and how it is to be told
  • Style – writers choice of words, and his or her arrangement of them in sentences and longer units of discourse
  • Irony – very contemporary point of view
  • Symbolism – metaphor
  • Theme – what general topics the story addresses

Steps to writing a Literary Analysis
  1. 1. Annotate the work.
  2. 2. Freewrite.
  3. 3. Otline structure.
  4. 4. Identify elements (& explain their function).
  5. 5. Describe the context.
  6. 6. Consider point of view or perspective.
  7. 7. Discuss with others.
  8. 8. Select two key passages. Relate them.
  9. 9. Write a draft.
10.Revise after feefback.

Chapter 7: Writing About Film
Combination of Three Mediums
  1. 1. Theater
  2. 2. Photography
  3. 3. Fiction

Elements of Film
  • Photography
  • Subject, Color, Purpose, Lighting, Style, Compositions
    • o (Shots, Focus, Sequence)
    • Fiction Elements
    • Acting
    • Mise en Scene – theater term to refer to how things are “staged”
    • Diegesis – film term to talk about everything in the story
    • Movement
    • Editing
    • Sound/Music








Laura Rickrich

Live Blog 1/27/14

Writing for the Humanities

Pre-Writing:
  1. 1. Lists – items in a set, details that can be abstracted out and represent the text, logic, frequency, pattern should occur
  2. 2. Annotation
    1. a. Margin – should be constructive, add to the reading, add your own text/work
    2. b. Symbol system – use a system uniformly every time you annotate a text
    3. c. Synthesis
    4. 3. Free writing – you connecting your ideas, should be in prose: subject, verb, object
    5. 4. Summarizing/Analyzing – making an argument, They say, I say, pre-writing but not yet there (they you say is the second half of your writing)

*Good pieces of writing should be able to be retro-outlined (should be similar if not the same as the outline the author would have used in writing it).

Writing:
  1. 1. Draft (8-10)
  2. 2. Editing/Proofreading (11-13) – check for errors, leave text for at least 6 hours and then coming back to it, do editing after, DO NOT editing while writing something
  3. 3. Revision (10-11) – feedback

General Approach to Writing the Humanities:
  1. 1. React to Understand (20-26) – suspend judgment
    1. a. Emotions are stirred
    2. b. Felt reaction
    3. c. Influence
    4. d. Impression

The Starry Night – Vincent van Gogh (21-23)
Sexton’s “Starry Night” (23-24)
The Starry Night Context (24-25)

  1. 2. Interpret to Explain
DiYanni’s model:
  1. a. Observe Details
  2. b. Connect Observations
  3. c. Develop Inferences
  4. d. Draw Conclusions from Inferences

Andrew’s model (for stronger argumentation/persuasion-based):
  1. a. Establish warrants for the claim
  • Warrants are evidence to support a claim
  1. b. Test the warrants against others that support alternate claims
  • Figure out which claim is the truest
  1. c. Outline the conclusions of the claim, if the warrant is true

  1. 3. Evaluate for Significance
    1. a. Values?
  • View on life… cultural, moral and aesthetic beliefs

*Provide the context for making valued judgments, in turn allows people to make effective value judgments (good questions lead to good answers)

Elements of Fiction:
  • Plot – sequence of action, includes tension and involves resolution
  • Structure – how the story is told, rather than what the story is/how the story was put together
  • Character – meant for specific purpose, represent and stand for something
  • Setting/Context/Mood – where everything is taking place
  • Point of View – what was the author trying to introduce to the conversation, their own point of view
  • Style – collection of variety of different elements that are used
  • Irony – creating a detachment between themes
  • Symbolism – metaphor, story stands in for something, connects to larger conversation
  • Themes – connections to wider conversation, general topics story addresses

Steps to Writing a Literary Analysis:
  1. 1. Annotate work
  2. 2. Free write – take that work and create new work, your thinking on a piece
  3. 3. Outline structure
  4. 4. Identify elements
  5. 5. Describe to context
  6. 6. Consider point of view or perspective
  7. 7. Discuss with others
  8. 8. Select two key passages. Relate theme. (Be specific!)
  9. 9. Write a draft
10.Revise after feedback

Film:
  1. 1. Theater
  2. 2. Photography
  3. 3. Fiction

Elements of Film:
  • Photography
    • o Subject, color, purpose, lighting, style, composition
      • § (Shots, Focus, Sequence)
      • Fiction Elements
      • Acting – how did the acting contribute to the story
      • Mise en Scene
      • Diegesis – what they are actually saying to one another
      • Movement
      • Editing
      • Sound/Music





Jake Mulkey 4:10 Class
1/27/2014 Notes/Live Blog

1/27/2014
COMPSTD 2367.08 NOTES
Ch. 1: Skills

Pre-Writing:
  • Lists (2-3)
  • Annotation (3-4)
    • o Should have margin notes, symbols, and synthesizing.
    • o Margins must have pattern; there should be a reason for writing things in the margins
    • o Symbol systems should be uniform across your markups of texts
      • § Square, most important thing on page
      • § Circle, supporting ideas
      • § Underline, more minor details
      • Free-writing (4-6)
      • Summarizing/Analyzing (6-8)
        • o Summarizing and analyzing (they say/I say), summarizing is “They”, analyzing is the “I”

Writing:
  • Draft (8-10)
  • Editing/Proofreading (11-13)
    • o Checking for errors, putting things in the best place possible, peer-editing
    • o 6hrs after, edit after you write
    • o To begin writing, a warm-up, is to edit previously written material
    • Revision (10-11)


Ch 2: Overview

General Approach to Writing the Humanities:

1) React to Understand:
  • Emotions stirred
  • Felt reaction
  • Influence
  • Impression
2) Interpret to Explain:
DiYanni’s Model:
  1. 1. Observe Details
  2. 2. Connect Observations
  3. 3. Develop Inferences
  4. 4. Draw Conclusions from Inferences

Andrew’s Model:
  1. 1. Make a Claim
  2. 2. Establish warrants for the claim
  3. 3. Test the warrants against others that support alternate claims
  4. 4. Outline the conclusions of the claim, if the warrant is true
3) Evaluate for Significance:
Values? Cultural, moral, and aesthetic beliefs.


Ch. 5: Writing About Fiction

Elements of Fiction:
Plot
Structure: how the plot is put together, the order in which something is told; sections, chapters
Character
Setting/Context/Mood: the context, and feeling, where things take place in relation to others
Point of View: what was the culture trying to say for themselves; the way they think, style
Style: elements that lead up to something having a certain overall set of characteristics
Irony
Symbolism: metaphors, meaning behind something/something else
Theme: what to take away from a fiction, overarching conversation of the piece

Writing a Literary Analysis (91)
  1. 1. Annotate the work
  2. 2. Free-write
  3. 3. Outline the structure
  4. 4. Identify elements
  5. 5. Describe the context
  6. 6. Consider point of view or perspective
  7. 7. Discuss with others
  8. 8. Select two key passages. Relate them (most important)
  9. 9. Write a draft
  10. 10. Revive after feedback

Ch. 7: Writing About Film

Elements of Film:**
  • Photography
  • Subject, color, purpose, lighting, style, composition (shots, focus, sequence)
  • Fiction elements
  • Acting
  • Mise en Scene(staging)
  • Diegesis (everything in the story
  • Movement
  • Editing
  • Sound/Music